Mahn Funeral Home
Obituaries...

Service Schedule

Mahn, William J. "Bill"

Visitation:
Date: Thursday, May 3, 2012
Time: 4:00pm - 8:00pm

Visitation Location:
Mahn DeSoto Chapel

Service:
Date: Friday, May 4, 2012
Time: 11:00am

Service Location:
St. Andrew United Methodist Church, Rock Road, DeSoto, MO

Interment:
Hillsboro City Cemetery


Memorials/Donations
May be made to the DeSoto Little League or the American Heart Association

Obituary
William J. "Bill" Mahn, 89, DeSoto, entered into rest on April 30, 2012 at his residence. Bill was born in DeSoto on September 16, 1922; he was the son of the late Daniel J. and Aurelia C. (Prendergast) Mahn, Sr. He leaves behind his loving wife, Irmalee (Ritterbush) Mahn of DeSoto.

Mr. Mahn was the owner of Wm. J. Mahn Plumbing. He is also survived by three sons: William J. "Bill" (Beverly) Mahn, Jr. of Jupiter, Florida, Mike A. (Ginny) Mahn, Indiana and Mark S. (Alexandra) Mahn of DeSoto and a daughter, Lee Ellen Mahn of DeSoto; four sisters, Mary Collins, Ellen Mahn and Margaret Parmeley all of St. Louis and Patricia "Pat" (Ralph) Noack, DeSoto; Eight grandchildren: Ben Mahn, Jason Mahn, Nick Mahn, Stephanie Mahn, Connor Mahn, Grant Mahn, Jake Hertenstein and Ross Hertenstein and one great-grandchild, Olivia Mahn.

Bill was preceded in death by his parents, five brothers: Daniel J. "DJ" Mahn, Edward J. "Ed" Mahn, Gerald J. "Jerry" Mahn, Vincent J. "Fly" Mahn and Robert J. Mahn; and one sister, Marcia Mahn.

"Bill" served during World War II, in the First Army Infantry 104th Timberwolf Division under General Terry Allen in the 804th Ordinance. After 12 days on a troop ship crossing the Atlantic, the 104th was the first division to go directly from New york to the coast of Cherburg France. Often engaged in heavy fighting, crossing rivers, they pushed the German Army back through Belgium, Holland, France and Germany until meeting the Russians at Halle Germany. 195 days of continuous combat is believed to be a record. Their motto "NOTHING IN HELL CAN STOP THE TIMBERWOLVES" BECAME FAMOUS. Victory Europe Day, May 7, 1945, marked the surrender of the German Army. The 104th were sent back to the U.S. and given furloughs, and told the unit was being readied for departure to Japan. With the surrender of the Japanese, the soldiers of the 104th were discharged.

Rev Darlene Payne will be officiating the service.

    

Back to Obituaries List

Close This Window